Monstober Day 28: Choir.

These beings resemble a floating set of choir robes, holding a dagger or song book in invisible hands. If encountered as a group, they form a powerful amalgam, each more destructive than the one before it. Their faces have narrow eye slits and elongated mouths. The sounds they emit are capable of driving sane beings mad or destroying structures.

Choir of Discord.

For Dungeon Crawl Classics or similar D20 games.
These beings resemble a floating set of choir robes, holding a dagger or song book in invisible hands. If encountered as a group, they form a powerful amalgam, each more destructive than the one before it. Their faces have narrow eye slits and elongated mouths. The sounds they emit are capable of driving sane beings mad or destroying structures.

Dark Singer:

Init +1; Atk dagger +3 melee (1d4); AC 13; HD 5d8; MV 20’, fly 30’; Act 1d20; SP destructive song (DC 13 Will if soloist. See Below.) Disruptive Aura; SV Fort +2, Ref +3, Will +6; AL C.

Solo stats are as above. However they rarely appear this way. Song of Madness. AC, HD, and Saves as above.

Duet. Init +2, Act 2d20, Song of Torment- save becomes DC 14. AC14, +1d8 HD, All Saves +1

Trio: Init +3, Act 2d20, Song of Destruction save becomes DC 15.

Quartet: Init +4, Act 2d20+1d24, Destructive Song save becomes DC 16.

Chamber Choir (5 -12) +1d8 HD per member. Act 2d20+1d24. All saves +1 per member. Dischord of Discord. All with hearing within 10′ per choir member must make a Fort Save DC 13 + 1 for every two members. Take 6d8, save for half damage. Nearby structures begin to take this damage (no save) every round after the second.

Disruptive Aura: Any creature that moves within 5′ of a Dark Singer or group must make a Will Save DC 12 (regardless of group size) or lose 1 action for 1d4 rounds.

Thanks for stopping by. Art and more on their abilities as well as origin to come.

Monstober Day 29: Wing.

The Turkey Demon: A jet black fire-breathing turkey with six tentacles and it can fly, too.

The Turkey Demon: A jet black fire-breathing turkey with six tentacles and it can fly, too.

Turkey Demon (Type 3): Init +2; Atk tentacle +9 melee (1d4) and beak +10 melee (1d8); AC 16; HD 6d8; MV walk 20’ or fly 40’; Act 7d20; SP Infravision, darkness (+12 check) grasp 1d4, Breathe Fire SV Fort +5, Ref +2, Will +5; AL C.

Immune to weapons of less than +2 enchantment or natural attacks from creatures of 5 HD or less; half-damage from fire, acid, cold, electricity, gas.

Tentacle attack: For each tentacle that strikes the same character, the demon receives 1d4 on an opposed Strength check to hold the character down. For example, if 6 tentacles hit a character in a single round, the character takes 6 points of damage, and the demon rolls 6d4 on a Strength check against the character. If the demon wins the Strength check, the character is grappled and cannot attack unless he spends the next round struggling and succeeds on an opposed Strength check. The demon may not use its breath weapon while a character is grappled.

Breath Weapon: The Turkey Demon breathes a cone of shadowy fire, width 1d4x10’, length 1d6 x 10’ 6d8 damage, Ref save for half. Characters hit with the breath weapon continue to burn with corrupt flame for 1d6 damage per turn for 1d3 turns.

Monstober Day 25: Cave.

This fierce subterranean species of giant spider stalks its prey from the shadows before pouncing on it! #Monstober #Monstober2022 @TrueFeyQueen888 @TrueFeyGaming @Mrs_MothMan_Art

Sabre tooth Cave Spider.

For Dungeon Crawl Classics and other D20 based RPGs.

This monster lurks in caves and other semi-subterranean areas, preferring mostly large game as its meal. This spider is roughly the size of a lion or similar large cat. If cornered or outnumbered, it will retreat to its lair, usually nearby.

Sabre Tooth Cave Spider: Init +3; Atk bite +6 melee (1d10 plus poison) Pounce +4 melee (1d8 plus extra attack.); AC 16; HD 4d8; MV 30’; Act 1d20; SP poison (DC 20 Fort save or lose an extra 3d4+4 hit points and 4 Agility temporarily; success results in loss of additional 1d4 hit points only), stealthy (+10 to attempts to move silently); SV Fort +2, Ref +1, Will -1; AL C.

The sabre tooth cave spider will always attempt to attack from the shadows, attempting to paralyze its prey before dragging it off to be eaten. It prefers to Pounce from a short distance to catch its prey off guard. If this attack is successful, the spider immediately gets its regular attack on the target for free. It rarely attacks more than two or three creatures, especially if man-sized or greater.

At the Judge’s discretion, there could be as many as 3-5 of these spiders operating together in a single area. They share the risks as well as the prey. If the target is large enough, two of these spiders have been known to take down the same target.

Monstober Day 18: Gulp

Picture, if you will, an enormous bipedal hammerhead shark with four large sucker covered tentacles sticking out of its face. It has a gigantic maw filled with rows of razor sharp teeth. For added intensity, there are sharp, blade like projections running down the center of its back.

Apparently Frog and (be)hemoth isn’t a creature unless the nice Wizards of the Coast give permission.

Sigh. So, I present my take on a classic favorite. This is the Sharkhemoth. It’s preferred method of digesting its prey is to slam them into its giant, tooth-filled maw.

Picture, if you will, an enormous bipedal hammerhead shark with four large sucker covered tentacles sticking out of its face. It has a gigantic maw filled with rows of razor sharp teeth. For added intensity, there are sharp, blade like projections running down the center of its back.

Sharkhemoth: Init +2; Atk bite +5 melee (1d10+3) + Swallow (see below), Tentacle +3 melee (1d8+3) + grab; AC 15; HD 6d8+2; hp 25; MV 30’ Swim 40′; Act 4d20; SP Grab, Swallow whole; SV Fort +5, Ref +3, Will +1; AL C.

If the attack roll for the bite is 4 or more greater than the number required (or a Critical Hit), they can swallow creatures (man-size or smaller) whole; swallowed victims take 3d6 points of damage each round thereafter.

Tentacle attacks: If one tentacle hits, do damage as normal (1d8+3,) If two tentacles hit the same target, the target must make a Ref Save DC 12 or be grabbed. Grabbed targets with two tentacles reduce their action dice by one step. If three tentacles hit the same target, the target must make a Ref Save DC 14 or be grabbed. Grabbed targets with three tentacles reduce their action dice by two steps. If all four tentacles hit the same target, the target must make a Ref Save DC 16 or be grabbed. Grabbed targets with four tentacles reduce their action dice by three steps. Once grabbed, the target may make a STR check equal to the DC of the Ref save used to make the initial attack (2 = DC 12, 3= DC 14, 4= DC 16.) to break free. Breaking free of the tentacles may only be attempted once per turn one of the character’s actions.

If grabbed by all four tentacles, the Sharkhemoth automatically receives a fifth attack as a free action to attempt to bite/swallow anyone in its tentacles.

Monstober Day 24: Hag.

While many female Ogres live normal, healthy, productive lives, some sprout wings and embrace the twisted demonic and arcane arts. They soon separate themselves from their tribes, even leaving their mates if they had any. These beings are extremely rare and not to be taken lightly.

The Ogre Hag for Dungeon Crawl Classics.

While many female Ogres live normal, healthy, productive lives, some sprout wings and embrace the twisted demonic and arcane arts. They soon separate themselves from their tribes, even leaving their mates if they had any. These beings are extremely rare and not to be taken lightly.

Ogre Hag: Init +2; Atk staff +5 melee (1d6+6); AC 16; HD 5d8+4; MV Walk 20’ Fly 25′; Act 1d20; SP Evil Eye, Poison Brewing, Demon Servant, Cast spells as Level 3 Wizard; SV Fort +4, Ref +2, Will +1; AL C.

One of the Ogre Hag’s eyes tends to be larger than the other. This eye projects evil upon anyone who crosses the Hag’s path. When used as a free action, the Eye forces everyone looking at it to make a Will Save DC14. If the fail is saved, the character suffers a -2 penalty to all rolls for attack, damage, saves, spell fails, turn unholy, etc for the rest of the encounter.

Ogre Hags spend a great deal of time brewing poisons for other creatures or their own wicked uses. The Hag will normally have 1d4 vials of contact poison on her that can be hurled or even spat upon enemies to sicken, blind or disorient them.

The Hag may also summon a loyal Type 2 random Demon Servant at a 20% chance, 1x/day. This chance increases to 30% if the hag prepares for at least one hour. The servant lasts for one encounter or until dismissed. The death of the summoner always releases the demon.

Gold Pieces vs the Common Living Wage in Fantasy Role Playing Games.

Retainers would be easy to come by at that point. But our old friend Jimmy the torch bearer is suddenly going to up his torch bearing game and his prices. He’s probably going to ask for a raise to 3GP per day instead of 3 CP. Then there’s health and dental benefits, especially for his dying grandmother. Probably even talk of the torch bearers and dungeon loot porters forming a union of some kind.

Adventurers walk around with hundreds, even thousand of Gold Pieces (GP), yet most commoners make their wages in terms of Copper (CP) and Silver (SP.)

Quick explanation of coinage from a Basic fantasy OSR type game. Pretty common system.

One single gold piece would be considered a fortune to most peasants who normally earn their wages in terms of copper and silver. However, certain professions would be considered very lucrative in a medieval fantasy society. Quite honestly, I think either the standards should change or the amount of loot adventurers run around with needs to be seriously nerfed. Honestly, it could go either way.

What jobs pay well if I were a commoner?

Presuming the adventurers are still bringing cart loads of gold, magic items, and art objects into a tiny village, who would profit the most? Let’s start with the innkeeper. Most farmers, cobblers, and carpenters come in, buy an ale for maybe 3cp. Most adventurers come in and order “top shelf” ale and the finest accommodations and throw gold around like it’s nothing. They also tend to blow the place up occasionally or get into the occasional donnybrook.

The other townsfolk that always seem to do well for themselves around adventurers are blacksmiths, especially those well versed in weapons or armor. Animals also need shod and barded on occasion. Anyone with an anvil and a forge seem to be in high demand everywhere, but adventurers usually want a rush job and pay extra well.

Let’s not forget the shopkeepers. If a town is (un)fortunate enough to have a general store, they may find themselves at the mercy or good will of an adventuring party. Rations, new water/wineskins, torches, oil, bags, rope and more might be available at a bargain. Unscrupulous shopkeepers usually find themselves on the business end of the group’s weapons. Generous, kind, and understanding villagers might develop a working relationship with the group.

Photo by Mehmet Turgut Kirkgoz on Pexels.com

Never overlook the power (or price) of experts.

(Insert evil-ish GM laugh here.) Suppose the group comes into town with a member of the group that is missing a couple of fingers and may have accidentally been poisoned (by his own weapon.) Said group, not having a Cleric or anyone knowledgeable in dealing with such things is going to need an apothecary before the dumb Thief expires messily. While their friend is being tended, the rest of the group is free to go off an hammer down some ale, but they might want to be careful how much they spend. Apothecary services can run tens or even hundreds of gold depending on the severity of the illness/injury. Otherwise our apothecary could just tell the barbarian to go out to the town cemetery and dig a grave.

A lot of what NPCs charge will be determined by the Judge/GM/DM. It could be based off of what their professional guild recommends or by what the NPC in question would think is reasonable. Non-magical aid would require far less of a toll than magical aid. Reattaching limbs, removing curses, and raising the dead would be far beyond the capabilities of villagers and townsfolk in most fantasy RPG settings. Those capable would likely charge a hefty pile of gold.

Let’s look at Medieval England circa 1300 as an example.

I’m using The History of England as my example.

English wages circa 1300.

Let’s pretend £1 = 1GP and 1 schilling = 1SP. Pence are obviously 1CP. Yes, I know D&D and most other fantasy RPGs use 10CP=1SP, but we’ll make an exception here.

Unskilled labor would be people such as barmaids, stable boys, and many common villagers. I’m guessing slightly more skilled laborers are represented under the second category of Laborer?

I imagine an apothecary or other guild specialist had their prices determined by their professional guild. I’d put them somewhere in the range of £4-5 per year. That’s a guess. Guilds and independent artisans probably chose to charge more or less depending on circumstances.

I estimate blacksmiths and other cottage artisans were mostly paid by selling goods, which is why they are not listed above. I’m certain a fair amount of barter also occurred prior to 1600 AD in the real world much as it would likely happen in most fantasy RPGs. How much are cows, chickens, trades, favors and other items worth? Can you really put a price on friendship and goodwill?

Putting it in some perspective.

In Dungeon Crawl Classics, adventurers are about 1% of the population. (1 out of every 100 people.) That 1% brings back hundreds if not thousands of gold potentially to small towns and villages where the average living wage is no more than, say 5 GP per year.

Wouldn’t ALL of the townsfolk flock to incoming adventurers begging to provide goods, chickens, services, etc? Would less scrupulous villagers suddenly start price gouging?

“Wot? No we’re having a special today. That loaf of bread is going to cost 1 GP.”
or
“Want to buy me lantern? That’ll be 10 gold and, uh, how about that horse you rode in on?”

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

It could potentially get out of control fast. Suddenly a room at the inn comes to a total of 100 GP per night. Or the innkeeper says, “I guess our adventurers could go out of town and sleep in some farmer’s barn or probably on the cold, hard ground again. The inn has nice, soft beds and warm chambermaids to attend to their every wanton desire. ”

Who’s gonna turn that room down? It’s only a couple hundred gold out of thousands, right? Sure hope the town’s banking establishment and exchequer isn’t corrupt. “What bag of gold? Oh, this little thing? That’s a coin purse, not thousands of gold crowns. Surely you jest.”

Of course, corrupt practices could result in adventuring parties burning the entire town to the ground if they’re serious murder hobos.

I recently talked to a player who literally destabilized the economy of an entire town, possibly the whole province.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

He gave 10GP to every villager he encountered. Yet another player threatened to teach “Magic Missile Class.” and turn as many who showed up into Level 1 Wizards. What would those actions do to a town where silver and copper are the standard medium of exchange? It’s mind boggling.

It’s not dissimilar to a government sending out $1,000 checks to every tax paying citizen in the country. It does some truly crazy things to inflation in the modern world. Imagine the kind of havoc it could wreak in the fantasy medieval world.

Retainers would be easy to come by at that point. But our old friend Jimmy the torch bearer is suddenly going to up his torch bearing game and his prices. He’s probably going to ask for a raise to 3GP per day instead of 3 CP. Then there’s health and dental benefits, especially for his dying grandmother. Probably even talk of the torch bearers and dungeon loot porters forming a union of some kind.

Ultimately, it’s in the hands of the Judge/GM/DM.

Big money, spending GP.

What I’m trying to get at is there seems to always be a massive fiscal disparity between the rules as written for what typical villagers/townsfolk make vs the ludicrous amounts of gold the average adventuring party hauls out of a dungeon. When there’s a massive gap between the haves and the have-nots in the real world, it leads to socio political upheaval. In a fantasy game, it just makes a big mess for the NPCs and probably a headache for most GMs.

I know a lot of DMs tend to rewrite the chart for goods and services. In some cases the scaling almost looks like our more modern economy. 1 GP = $1. That way when the group floods a town with gold they’re barely making a dent in the economy. Is it possible to devalue the GP in a fantasy economy? If someone was paying attention, they could teach the school kids a real lesson in economics.

Thank you for stopping by. I hope all of this ends up being of some use. We might take this discussion up again later. I appreciate you being here.

Monstober Day 22: Forest.

This dire, horrible bear has its face peeled back and skull exposed. Two spindly spider legs protrude on each side of the creature’s thorax and a large abdomen with two spinnerets and an hourglass mark on its furry back. The mere sight of this creature makes many seasoned adventurers freeze in terror.

This hideous arcane/demonic abomination is one of many for a dungeon in development.

This dire, horrible bear has its face peeled back and skull exposed. Two spindly spider legs protrude on each side of the creature’s thorax and a large abdomen with two spinnerets and an hourglass mark on its furry back. The mere sight of this creature makes many seasoned adventurers freeze in terror.

Skullus Spider Bear: Init +3; Atk bite +7 melee (1d6+3 plus poison) Claw +7 melee (1d6+3); AC 17; HD 5d8 (32 hp); MV 40’; Act 1d20; SP poison (DC 22 Fort save or lose 1d4+4 Strength permanently; success results in temporary loss of 1 Strength), web (10’ diameter, see General description of spider web spell, DCC RPG, p. 196); SV Fort +5, Ref +3, Will +1; AL C.

My concept sketch of the bearbug in question.

You Find a +1 Sword, But…

A new 1d12 table of magical swords. Some are cursed, others are just strange. Have fun!

This is a take on the Improv technique of Yes, but…

Roll 1d12 to see what the gods of magic and (mis) fortune have in store for you.

  1. It’s not obviously cursed. It’s still +1 to hit, but on any max damage or critical hit, the sword shatters and can’t be repaired without extreme magic.
  2. It’s a Sword of Magma. It’s a Sword +1 that becomes +3 Flaming when the command word on the hilt is spoken. However, when flaming, the sword begins to emit molten lava until the command word is spoken again. The lava will drip/run back onto the wielder dealing 1d6 fire damage until extinguished or removed. The lava begins to make the blade heavy after 3 rounds granting a cumulative -1 to hit. The lava all magically disappears when the command word is spoken again.
  3. It’s stuck in a large stone. The sword glows of magic. Only the weakest (Lowest Strength, Constitution is the tie-breaker.) member of the party can pull it out. It’s still +1 to hit, +1 damage. IF the wieder’s Strength is below 12, it rises to 12 while the sword is held.
  4. The new owner is permanently attuned to it. It is a permanently cursed sword that will ALWAYS find its way back to its new owner. Only death unlocks the curse. It can be thrown into an active volcano and the next day, it will reappear on the owner’s person or convenient nearby location. Scabbard included.
  5. It can’t decide on a size. When found, it has the hilt of a dagger and a scabbard of a longsword. Any time it is drawn, it changes shape. It can be anything from a dagger to a zweihander (2 Handed/Greatsword.) It shrinks back down to dagger size as soon as the tip of the blade touches the opening of the scabbard again.
  6. It’s super lightweight. The wielder may choose to swing this longsword with Agility (Dexterity) to hit/damage. It also floats on water. It does not have an encumbrance value. It can also be used as an offhand weapon with no penalty.
  7. It’s all good until you try to pick it up. This sword is super heavy regardless of type. It can only be used without penalty by characters of 16 Strength or higher. it is considered unnaturally heavy. Triple encumbrance for the wielder while in its sheath. Non wielders suffer five times the encumbrance of a regular weapon.
  8. It’s really shiny! This is a sword +1, +3 vs Un-dead. It has a permanent Light spell cast upon it and always glows brightly when removed from its sheath.
  9. It’s all good until you say the word engraved into the blade. When invoked, the sword summons a Velociraptor that will immediately attack the closest target. If slain, the raptor can be summoned again the next day. This power can be used 1x/day. The raptor always has max hp. It disappears after 10 rounds or 10 minutes if summoned out of combat and for some reason it doesn’t try to eat the wielder.
  10. The sword hums within 66′ of a demon or demonkin. The closer the demon, the louder the hum becomes. It can’t be silenced by any means. +1/+3 vs Demons.
  11. Its blade is made of solid ice. +1, +3 vs Fire elementals. The sword freezes solid again as soon as the hilt makes contact with the sheath.
  12. It’s a perfectly normal sword. And it will tell you that telepathically. It likes to speak to its new owner a lot. It’s very chatty, in fact. It might have other intelligent weapon properties, maybe? (*It could just be telepathic, too. The final properties are up to the DM/GM/Judge.)
Quick bladed weapon table.

1-2. Dagger
3-5. Shortsword
6-8. Longsword
9. Bastard Sword (Hand-and-a-Half Sword.)
10-11. Two Handed Sword.
12. Polearm (Flamberge, Bardiche, Naginata or some other blade on a pole.)

Bastard Sword (Hand-and-a-Half) deals 1d8 damage wielded one handed and 1d10 damage wielded two handed with no penalties switching between the two. Costs 17 Gold. Must be forged by a master blacksmith and are usually tailored to a specific wielder.

This table is compatible with Dungeon Crawl Classics and can be easily adapted to most Old School Renaissance games with little effort.

5 Magical Crossbows and Their Effects

The owner may see 60′ in the dark as a Dwarf while holding the weapon.
Once per day, the firer may invoke The Skull. This causes a regular quarrel to turn into a fiery skull-shaped missile that screams all the way to the target. It always hits the intended target and does the weapon’s normal damage and an additional 2d6 damage, plus lose 1d6 Con temporarily and be stunned for 1d3 rounds. (A single DC 15 Fort Save for half the effect, half/no Con and no stun.)
The shooter suffers effects regardless of the weapon’s damage. Roll 1d12:

For Dungeon Crawl Classics or other OSR style games.

Regular Crossbow:* Damage: 1d6 Range: 80/160/240 Cost:30SP

1. Crossbow of the Venomous Asp

This crossbow +1 to hit/+1 damage fires a blazing bolt of green energy toward the target of the firer’s choosing. If the bolt hits, the target takes 2d6 poison damage (DC 12 Fort Save for half poison damage) in addition to the damage caused by the bolt. This effect lasts 1d3 rounds or until a second Fort save is made, healing magic or the target expires.

This effect may be used up to 3 times per day. A command word must be spoken each time the power is used.

2. Repeating Crossbow of Shards

This +1 to hit/ +1 damage crossbow comes equipped with a hopper on top and a crank that allows it to hold up to 9 quarrels. This weapon comes equipped with a curious selector switch on the side:
Single Shot, as a regular +1 Crossbow
Automatic: The Crossbow is hand cranked and shoots a single attack roll. The target is hit with 1d3 quarrels per shot with 3 quarrels always being expended.
Shard: This causes the crossbow to magically split the quarrel into a 5′ x 30′ Cone of splinters. Those caught in the cone must make a DC 12 Ref save or take 1d10 points of damage. This effect only expends one quarrel and may be used as often as the character firing it desires.

3. Screaming Skull Thrower of Death.

This crossbow has what appears to be a skull at the end of it. There are glowing red gems set in the eye sockets. The stock appears to have been carved from solid black wood of unearthly origin and the arms are engraved with demonic runes. The entire weapon has an ominous glow.
It is considered extremely dangerous, cursed, and will bond with a character that has suitable skills as a crossbow archer.

This weapon retains a +3 to hit/+3 damage bonus.
The owner may see 60′ in the dark as a Dwarf while holding the weapon.
Once per day, the firer may invoke The Skull. This causes a regular quarrel to turn into a fiery skull-shaped missile that screams all the way to the target. It always hits the intended target and does the weapon’s normal damage and an additional 2d6 damage, plus lose 1d6 Con temporarily and be stunned for 1d3 rounds. (A single DC 15 Fort Save for half the effect, half/no Con and no stun.)
The shooter suffers effects regardless of the weapon’s damage. Roll 1d12:
1. The shooter is instantly reduced to 1 hp. Must make a Fort save or be rendered unconscious.
2. (DCC Characters) Roll once on the Greater Corruption Table and apply the effects.
3. The character is haunted for one day by an antagonistic spirit. -2 to any roll involving concentration.
4. (DCC Characters) Roll once on the Major Corruption Table and apply the effects.
5. The character is deafened for 24 hours.
6. (DCC Characters) Roll once on the Minor Corruption Table and apply the effects.
7. The firer gains the amount of temporary hp equal to the total amount lost by the target from this attack.
8. The character summons an imp. It will harass and antagonize the owner of the crossbow until banished, killed, or 24 hours expire.
9. The character is struck blind when not holding the weapon. This effect lasts 1d3 days.
10. The weapon emits a Banshee scream. The ghost attacks with a bone-chilling
scream. Every living creature within 100’ automatically takes 1d4 sonic damage and is potentially deafened for 1d4 hours (DC 12 Fort save to resist). The ghost can issue this scream up to 3 times per hour. Dogs, horses, and other domesticated animals are automatically spooked by the scream.
11. The target temporarily loses an additional 1d6 Con regardless of the save as does the weapon’s firer. The firer’s hair automatically turns white permanently and the character is wracked with chills for 24 hours. -3 on all activities.
12. The firer has attracted the attention of a deity or other divine being. The final effect is left for the Judge to decide.

4. Blood Drinking Crossbow.

This cursed +1 to hit/+3 Damage crossbow drains 1d6+3 hp from a living target upon a successful hit (Fort Save DC 12 for half.) On a critical hit, the target must make a Fort Save DC14 or lose 3d6 hit points. (Half on a successful save.) However, the owner of this crossbow is a lighthouse beacon to attract any creature that feeds on blood (Vampires, Succubi, etc.) These creatures will be attracted to the crossbow and it’s owner if they are within 100 yards.

If this crossbow is abandoned or destroyed, the former owner takes 1 point of permanent Con drain until they recover the item or expire. If the weapon is stolen or misplaced and recovered by someone else, they take the same Con drain until it is returned.

5. Firecracker.

This crossbow is +1 to hit/+1 Damage, +3 Damage vs creatures vulnerable to fire. On command, the crossbow emits lights equal to a standard torch. 3/day for 6 rounds, any ammunition loaded into this weapon bursts into flame when launched. Inflicts additional 1d6 damage and ignites targets on fire (Ref save to avoid; DC 13.) On a critical miss, the firer must roll on the Major Corruption Table and be affected by the results. Also, every time a quarrel is fired and ignited, there is a 1 in 30 chance the gods themselves might take notice of this incredible weapon.

Promptober Day 31: Forbidden Books.

This seemingly innocuous cookbook contains a variety of strange recipes that range from bizarre, maybe disgusting, to poisonous and all the way up to powerfully cursed. It may save lives in a pinch or even provide PCs some magical benefits. On the other hand, these recipes could lead to lots of trouble.

Sure we’ve heard of the Necronomicon Ex Mortis, but what other scary books are there?

A few ideas for fantasy TTRPG book generation:
The Book of Shadows. Every witch has one. Some more frightening than others. Some hags would certainly have these on hand. An adventurer brave (or foolish) enough to interpret such a book would be privy to new spells. But at what cost?

Manual of Golem Creation. This tome contains all of the information needed to build a golem of one specific type. The question becomes how far would someone to go build one of these monstrosities?

Toben’s Spirit Guide. (*Editor’s Note. This book was inspired by a reference in the original 1984 Ghostbusters and subsequent RPG franchise. It can be found here.) This book contains references to dozens of spirits, ghosts, wraiths and spectres. For the unaware, it may also contain ways to summon them.

Spellbook of the Crazed Apprentice. This book was written by the seemingly unremarkable apprentice of a certain famous wizard whose title ended in “the Mad.” (*Watching out for copyrights on this one.) The apprentice improved upon or even perfected some spells. A player character casting them might suffer ill side effects.

Diary of a Death Knight. This simple journal holds an insidious secret. It contains the tales of a renowned paladin, his fall from prominence, and his eventual embrace of evil. Reading this book has a chance to corrupt or even convert a knight or warrior into one of these foul beings.

The Dark Cookbook. This seemingly innocuous cookbook contains a variety of strange recipes that range from bizarre, maybe disgusting, to poisonous and all the way up to powerfully cursed. It may save lives in a pinch or even provide PCs some magical benefits. On the other hand, these recipes could lead to lots of trouble.

The Alchemist’s Almanac. This book contains a variety of potion formulae. It is invaluable to alchemists and witches alike. Some versions of this book may contain twisted recipes for foul mutations and poisons as well. Characters may wish to use new formulae at their own risk.

The Book of Extradimensional Portals. This book is extremely thick and exceedingly rare. It contains magic rituals and in some cases locations for opening portals to other planes of existence. There is also a convenient appendix in the back containing banishment and portal sealing spells. One would be well advised to read the entire entry on any given portal before undertaking opening one.

The Accursed Memoir. Similar to the Diary of a Death Knight, this tome details a wizard’s creation of a phylactery and transformation into a lich. Wizard characters reading this can follow its step by step instruction to become a lich at their own peril. The last entry in the memoir describes the rush of power and further desire to gain even more power by becoming a demilich.

The Duplicitous Tome of the Diabolical Illusionist. (*This would make a good dungeon reward.) This tome is written in ink that glows faintly of magic. Some of the spells are illusory script. Some are sigils and glyphs intended to harm the reader. There are also powerful spells for an illusionist wizard who doesn’t lose their very mind trapped within its pages.

I didn’t list the Ogrenomicon, the Book of Ogres that I’m working on for Dungeon Crawl Classics. It will appear in the portfolio section of this site as soon as its ready. It’s my labor of love.

Thanks for stopping by. I’ll be catching up a lot of #Monstober and a few #Promptober entries in November. Lol! I appreciate your patience.

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