Would You Play in This Campaign?

What starts out as any other medieval forest fantasy game rapidly turns into a battle across dimensional planes to stop the Demon Emperor and his horrific army from rampaging across their world. The group will pretty much be all that stands between the dimensional conquerors and an innocent world full of otherwise good people. The PCs will also set the narrative for future campaigns.

Against the Shogun of Darkness

The first campaign set in my newest campaign world, but not the only one.

Campaign Pitch: What starts out as any other medieval forest fantasy game rapidly turns into a battle across dimensional planes to stop the Demon Emperor (Final name and title to be determined) and his horrific army from rampaging across their world. The group will pretty much be all that stands between the dimensional conquerors and an innocent world full of otherwise good people. The PCs will also set the narrative for future campaigns.

This campaign can be set in almost any fantasy world, but realize failure means the group sets a chain of events in motion that will undoubtedly rewrite canon and change the way the world develops.

The Emperor and his minions will introduce several new items and monsters to the game.

The entire campaign is planned for 12 episodes, with an episode lasting one to three sessions. The first two and the last two sessions are intended to be played in order, but otherwise, the DM is free to play the rest of the encounters in any order they wish. Episodes 11 and 12 can be moved up as needed. Episodes 3-10 can be skipped or shortened if preferred. There will be a lot of potential for character development lost in the middle, however.

The first two chapters included with the campaign will describe my world (to be named later.) This is intended to give the players some background and a feel for the world they will be trying to save. While monsters and evil things lurk in the shadows of dungeons and cities, there are good things everywhere. There are faeries, unicorns, good dragons and kind-hearted folk everywhere. Yes, there are bad people, as well, but fortunately, the hero populations keeps their numbers in check.

The PCs start out in the quiet village of Blooming Fern. It’s a quiet logging and farming community. It’s on a river which provides for commercial opportunities and plenty of fish. Daily life is quiet for the most part and other than the constable and a few night watchmen, a large police force is simply unnecessary. The mayor and the town council of elders make fair decisions and rulings, acting as both political leaders and judges for disputes and sentencing criminals. All are fair, hard-working, family fold with property and local businesses.

*Editor’s notes: This campaign idea was based off of some rough notes I scribbled into my calendar notebook. As I’m getting ready to switch notebooks, I found it and thought it might be cool to throw out there. Thank you to all who responded via #ttrpgTwitter

It’s pretty rough yet. Lots of revisions and changes before it would be a full fledged game.

Mining Old Books for New Content.

This trick works for more than just the superhero genre. Fantasy games, such as D&D, have far more modules already produced. Sometimes it’s as simple as updating the monsters and loot to the most current edition, which could involve some number crunching. However, if one is to choose a rules lite system such as ICRPG or Easy D6, conversions go very fast.

I keep a lot of old RPG books around that aren’t in PDF.

Good old MSH Reap the Whirlwind.

GM Tip: Never throw an old RPG book away. The same can be said for old modules, even homebrew ones. Please believe me when I say, “Never underestimate the value of an old module.”

The old adage that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure applies in this case. Take an old Marvel Superheroes Module like, Reap the Whirlwind, take the word “mutant” and change it to however supers are referred to in one’s own campaign and convert/add stats accordingly. Viola! Instant adventure for a couple of nights.

It’s one reason I favor simpler superhero games such as ICONS. They’re much easier to convert old Marvel and DC modules with. Games such as Mutants & Masterminds or Champions are a lot stat intensive and porting in all the baddies takes time and temperance.

Excavate those buried gems!

This trick works for more than just the superhero genre. Fantasy games, such as D&D, have far more modules already produced. Sometimes it’s as simple as updating the monsters and loot to the most current edition, which could involve some number crunching. However, if one is to choose a rules lite system such as ICRPG or Easy D6, conversions go very fast.

The same can be said for converting non-D&D adventures into other game systems. I know someone who really likes the Warhammer Fantasy setting, but doesn’t care much for the rule system. Solution: convert everything to D&D by approximation. One of my current projects is pulling old Basic D&D modules over into Dungeon Crawl Classics for my own use.

I’ve seen the Star Frontiers Crash on Volturnus module used as a Star Wars D6 adventure. I’ve seen Call of Cthulhu modules run in Beyond the Supernatural and D20 Modern. (Call of Cthulhu actually has a D20 variant, but the modules were original system.)

Wait, there’s more!

If you really want to expand your horizons as a GM, you might consider running modules across different genres. Call of Cthulhu investigators stumble into what looks an awful lot like a D&D dungeon full of monsters, riddles, and deadly traps. Star Wars characters have to go up against a rogue group of stormtroopers that have broken off of the Empire under the leadership of a maniacal megalomaniac with a skull shaped red mask. D&D characters suddenly find themselves up against Cthulhu cultists.

The possibilities are truly endless. If you’re a low prep GM and you have become adept at “winging it,” then this style of grab-n-go module prep might work very well for you. I’m more of a high prep GM, but I keep a LOT of old adventures around, especially D&D, that I can pull into my current game to run as a side trek or maybe as a one shot if key players are missing.

Thanks for stopping by. I hope you found this useful. Happy gaming!

7 Demon Chest for DCC RPG

Characters discover a chest that will unleash seven very powerful demons along with untold treasure if opened. What else is in the chest? Are the rumors true? If they find it, will they open it? The renowned Demonologist, Priests, and Monks who captured the demon constructed an elaborate shrine to contain the chest and educate all those who enter about the demons inside. Unfortunately, it reads like a treasure map.

This most cursed chest contains 7 powerful demons concealed away in a temple and believed to be sealed away for all of eternity.

A series of dungeons/mini campaign for Dungeon Crawl Classics.

Monks, priests, and other holy warriors fought and gave their lives to seal these most powerful demons inside this chest. The chest is sealed away in a forgotten shrine, bound in blessed chains and ofuda. Scrolls detailing each demon and how they were first defeated line the walls of the shrine.

There is a rumor that seven items of incredible power are also contained in the chest. Relics used by those who captured the 7 Demons are rumored to be hidden within the shrine. The good news is the relics used by the original captors are present within the shrine. The bad news is the items within the chest accompany the demons when they disappear.

Judge’s Synopsis: Characters discover a chest that will unleash seven very powerful demons along with untold treasure if opened. What else is in the chest? Are the rumors true? If they find it, will they open it? The renowned Demonologist, Priests, and Monks who captured the demon constructed an elaborate shrine to contain the chest and educate all those who enter about the demons inside. Unfortunately, it reads like a treasure map.

The good news is the demons can be returned to the chest with great effort. It will become the quest of those who foolishly open the chest to retrieve all of them. If any adventurer refuses the quests, their existence will be cursed and will ultimately end in woe.

Balor: True name hidden in the shrine. No one dares speak it.
Demo-Dragon. Maybe not the Demodragon, but definitely one of them.
Ghost of Summoner Sorcerer Yamada Daisuke: Servant of the Hidden Lord
Oni Lord Shoko O Futen. (Divine Wind of the Underworld.)
Osyluthe: aka Splintered Demon.
Void Demon: The Ghost in Darkness
Twin-Headed Hariti-Baku. Servant of Sezrekan.

*Judge’s Note: If/when the chest is actually opened, the priests that sealed the demons away used many scrolls and spells to assure the demons all return to their original lairs from which they were captured. Each tale of where they were found except the Ghost of Summoner Sorcerer Yamada Daisuke who is bound within the shrine. He will be the first challenge any group who opens the chest must face. He is also one of the scariest and most powerful outside the shrine.

Some of the names and who they serve have been changed from my original adventure notes to reflect the world of DCC.
This series of adventures was loosely inspired by The 13 Ghosts of Scooby Doo.

And similar OSR games.

1d12 Reasons Ships Drop Out of Hyperspace

Drive breakdown! Somebody missed something during the last maintenance cycle. The part that broke requires replacement.

Sometimes the Jump Drive shuts down mid-run.

Roll 1d12 to find out what went wrong with the long jump.

  1. Uncharted, unexplored planet! Group may wish to reconnoiter.
  2. Hyperspace particle waveform cloud. Ship must travel through regular space to get through the phenomenon.
  3. Life forms detected! A large life form or cloud of life forms that live in space.
  4. Another spacecraft in distress. Just close enough to cast a hyperspace shadow.
  5. Wreckage from a battle. May be pretty old.
  6. Pirates with a hyperspace shadow generator. Prepare to be boarded!
  7. Drive breakdown! Somebody missed something during the last maintenance cycle. The part that broke requires replacement.
  8. Binary star gravitational well.
  9. Astrogation malfunction! The drive is fine, but the computer controlling it has malfunctioned. Reprogramming requires skill and time.
  10. Hyper-intelligent cosmic energy being.
  11. Rogue comet or planetoid. Unmapped, unsurveyed chunk of ice, a moon or planet flying through space.
  12. Black Hole! Still time to maneuver out of it.

For use with any space RPG. Have fun with it. Thank you for stopping by.

Wayward Chimera

Something large has left a trail of blood and disturbed the ground as it crossed the trail. A little while later, there is a rustling in the brush. It almost sounds as if three animals are nearby together- A lion, a goat, and a dragon. What do you do?

Short Scenario for Dungeon Crawl Classics

This encounter works best is a wooded environment, but can be adapted to most other terrain types. Suitable for Characters Level 2 and up. The Judge will have to create his/her own maps or make use of theatre of the mind.

Read to party: You’ve been hearing commotion in the distance for most of the morning, but the morning’s fog and dense brush make it hard to discern exactly where from other than somewhere up ahead. It sounded as if two great beasts where having at one another. As you travel onward, the noise dies down to the horrible sound of a great wounded beast occasionally yowling from pain off in the distance.

Optional: [Something large has left a trail of blood and disturbed the ground as it crossed the trail. A little while later, there is a rustling in the brush. It almost sounds as if three animals are nearby together- A lion, a goat, and a dragon. What do you do? ]

Behind the Scenes (For the Judge.) Earlier in the day an enraged Manticore and a Chimera engaged in a bloody battle in the sky above the forest. The two creatures came into dispute when the Chimera stole an egg from the Manticore’s nest.

The great beasts tussled in mid-air and the chimera got the worst of it. It is now lurking in the underbrush with a broken, torn wing, foaming at the mouth from a venomous sting, and waiting for an easy kill to try to recover some strength.

Chimera: Init +0; Atk lion bite +5 melee (2d4) or goat gore +4 melee (2d4) or dragon bite +6 melee (1d10+2) or claws +4 melee (1d3) or breathe fire; AC 18; HD 5d8+8 (Currently 24hp) ; MV 30’ or fly 30’; Act 3d20; SP breathe fire 3/day; SV Fort +4, Ref +2, Will +2; AL C.

The chimera is a winged creature with the body and head of a lion, a second head of a goat, and a dragon’s head. It is a flying predator that hunts the lowlands where the livestock it preys upon typically gather. Each round, it has
three attacks, one from each head. The lion head bites, the goat head gores, and the dragon-head can breathe fire 3/day in a cone measuring 90’ x 30’, causing 3d8 damage (DC 15 Ref save for half).

The chimera might wait, hiding out until it can take down a party member separated from the group or possibly one or two of the pack animals, horses, etc if there are any. If the group is too large or too dangerous-looking, it might attempt to limp back to its lair. It will take great care to avoid the manticore. (In which case- skip the second paragraph of the Read Aloud text.)

Meanwhile, the Manticore has gone off in search of its egg. It is only slightly damaged. It has gone to ground to search for the chimera’s nest. There is a 30% chance it will hear any combat the group engages in and come to see if there is an easy meal. It is watching from the not-too-distant treetops to see if the chimera attempts to return to its lair.

Manticore: Init +5; Atk bite +6 melee (1d8) or claw +4 melee (1d3); AC 16; HD 6d8+6 (Currently 41hp); MV 40’, fly 50’; Act 3d20; SP barbed tail; SV Fort +5, Ref +4, Will +6; AL C. The other 50% of manticores have barbed scorpion tails. In combat, they can use an action to lash out with a single tail strike per round at +8 melee (1d10 + poison). The poison requires a DC 16 Fort save or the target loses 1d6 Stamina with each strike.

Additionally, the group may wish to find the Chimera’s lair, a hole in the ground not too far from their current location, surrounded with rocks, sticks and assorted offal. A careful search will reveal a +1 shortsword, a potion of Strength, and a torn suit of +1 chainmail.

The manticore’s egg is also lying in a heap of bloodied rags and grass. It is undamaged. The manticore will continue looking as long as she is able.

Usable with other OSR games.

Please enjoy this short scenario. Thank you for stopping by. I appreciate it.

d12 Tables: Freaky Things Along the River Bank

Roll 1d12 when characters stop along a river or large stream.

Roll 1d12 when characters stop along a river or large stream.

  1. Dragon Turtle! It may leave you alone, or not.
  2. 2d4 Giant Crayfish. (Use lobster stats)
  3. Mud Hen? What at first appears to be a normal chicken turns out to be a cockatrice.
  4. Mud Elementals. 1d4 of them slide up to the group. Why aren’t they covered in mud yet? The elementals will soon see that they are.
  5. A small boat containing 3 small hamster-esque humanoids sails by. Disturb them at your own risk. They seem harmless enough.
  6. Dinosaur (Gm’s Choice.) How it got here is anyone’s guess. It’s thirsty.
  7. Is that a Catoblepas? A large cow-like creature larger than a giraffe with a grumpy disposition rolls in the mud and sand on the bank. If left alone, it may not take interest in the party.
  8. Nereid/Nixie. Playful water sprites or aquatic fey appear in the water.
  9. Several Beaver-esque humanoids are working hard to dam up the river nearby. Could get messy for the people downriver.
  10. Humanoids. 1. Troglodytes. 2 Lizardmen. 3. Orcs. 4. Sahuagin. 5. Hag. 6. Merfolk. 7. Trolls. 8. Hobgoblins. 9. Kobolds. 10. Elf: Aquatic. 11. Doppelganger 12. Gnolls.
  11. Green slime infestation. Several yards of the acidic green stuff along the bank.
  12. A kindly old man fishing. Could be a dragon in disguise? Could be an old wizard? Could be an angelic being of some sort? Maybe a demon? Only one way to find out. Might literally just be an elderly human who lives nearby.
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Thoughts On a New Space Campaign.

‘ve been inspired by “The Orville” as it is somewhat as I imagine someone’s starship RPG campaign to look like. Unlike other TV series that take themselves too seriously at times, I think many RPG groups do pretty much insist on dropping some witty side banter and the occasional humorous situation.

Picture, if you will, “The Orville” using Star Frontiers Rules.

The sheer awesomeness of Space Freighter One.
Art by @tinyworld96

Gonna try to make my friend on Twitter, @FreighterOne proud with this one. I’m contemplating writing a short series of adventures or at least an outline for 9-12 episodes. It’s going to be centered on a smaller starship crew (the PCs and a few select NPCs) traveling through space and their wacky adventures every week.

I’ve been inspired by “The Orville” as it is somewhat as I imagine someone’s starship RPG campaign to look like. Unlike other TV series that take themselves too seriously at times, I think many RPG groups do pretty much insist on dropping some witty side banter and the occasional humorous situation. I think gamers tend to take things less seriously than Hollywood most of the time, anyway.

The only question I’m having currently is which system to use?

Nothing new, right? I’m always sort of hemming and hawing about which system I want to use for any given game. This is a campaign calling for something easy to learn, easy to play, fast and fun. This campaign will be designed around getting a group together for about a dozen sessions, so nothing too complicated.
My short list of contenders for this game:

  • ICRPG by Runehammer. Warp Shell gives us some sci-fi/space context. It’s a very easy system to work with. I could almost create a generic series of adventures and fill in the details later.
  • FATE by Evil Hat. This game company has been on a roll as of late. I like FATE for its simplicity, ease of adaptation and spiffy dice.
  • FrontierSpace by DwD. I mentioned Star Frontiers earlier. This is sort of the next generation of SF. It’s a bit crunchier than the previous two games. I like it a lot because of its harder sci-fi edge.
  • D6 System by West End Games (Nocturnal Media.) I mean, it worked for Star Wars, right? Plus I can design ships and characters in my head in less time than it takes me to write them down. I can still run this game blindfolded.
  • Shatterzone by West End Games (Precis Intermedia.) If you follow my blog, you probably know I have lots of love for old WEG products and Precis Intermedia for keeping some of them going. Shatterzone has awesome backstory and a deep world design, but it is a bit crunchier than everything else on the list.

Other thoughts included Starfinder, Cortex, SWADE, EGS, MCC, and even D&D 5E. I’m trying to minimize the crunch and find a base set of core rules that most players will have good access to. At the same time, I want a product that is more easily licensed in the event I decide to publish the campaign on DriveThruRPG.

I think with Spelljammer coming out soon, it might be fun to run a space game for a few weeks. You can only do so much fantasy, right? I think a space game set in Earth’s future might be a fun change of pace.

The next part of the series will be the first two episodes.

I like to link the first two episodes of any campaign together and usually the last two or three episodes. What can I say? I take a lot of RPG inspiration from TV and movies. My more structured campaign style functions very well with that format.

I want to do all of this without railroading the players, but unfortunately most published RPG campaigns and many adventures tend to be somewhat railroady in their presentation. I have learned a lot from Monster of the Week in terms of presentation, though. I might create episodes as missions this time.

Thanks again for stopping by. Space Freighter One isn’t helping me with any game development and probably has no idea I mentioned it. I just really wanted to give a friend a shout-out. Please go visit their site if you get a chance. I can’t think of humor and starship without thinking of SFO.

DCC Catacomb of the Wolf Lord Room: 2-2

The floor inside is grassy, covered in autumn leaves in many colors and shapes. The room has a warm, homecoming feel to it. The group is flooded with happy memories of warm meals and family at home. It’s as if they were being welcomed back after a long voyage.

You’ve faced the trials in the Happy Hunting Grounds, and now you emerge back into the hallway as if you had never left.

There remains about 10′ of dusty hallway before a tall stone arch decorated with faintly glowing blue arcane symbols all the way to its point. The room beyond appears a bit hazy, but parts of a very large skull can be seen in the room lying on the floor.

As the group approaches the arch, the runes glow a little brighter. No one has disturbed the dust on the floor in centuries.

Note to the Judge: the runes are intended as a red herring. At your discretion, there could be a force field barring the entry of the impure, but if they survived the trials of the Happy Hunting Grounds, then they should be allowed access. The mundane explanation for the runes is that they were part of the ritual allowing the body of the Wolf Lord to be entombed.

(Map to follow)

As the group passes through the archway, the room is illuminated with the warm glow of autumn dusk.

The room lights up and the bones of an enormous wolf lay in front of what appears to be a gigantic tree on the back wall. Puzzling, because there is no tree on the surface that corresponds with the roots/trunk.

The floor inside is grassy, covered in autumn leaves in many colors and shapes. The room has a warm, homecoming feel to it. The group is flooded with happy memories of warm meals and family at home. It’s as if they were being welcomed back after a long voyage.

There is a great deal of open ground in front of the party. In front and to the right are the bones of the Wolf Lord’s corporeal body. To the left are the bones of a human skeleton dressed in ceremonial robes. A grimoire and a journal lie next to the body, along with a medium sized chest.

Before the group gets a chance to investigate the body, a portal opens on the left wall. 5 large, snarling, hideous, frightening werewolves led by some sort of huge wolf demon burst through it!

Demon Werewolves: Init +7; Atk bite +8 melee (1d8+2) Claw +6 melee (1d6+2) ; Crit 19-20; AC 16; HD 4d6+4 ea; MV 40’; Act 1d24+ 1d20; SV Fort +6, Ref +6, Will +5; AL C. Infravision. Return to home plane when destroyed.
Immune to non-magical weapons or natural attacks from creatures of 3 HD or less; half damage from fire, acid, cold, electricity, gas. Vulnerable to Magic Weapons, Silver, Cold wrought Iron and wolfsbane.

Being bitten by one of these creatures causes a debilitating form of Lycanthropy. Fort Save DC 15. If afflicted, the character will rise on the next full moon as a minion of the Werewolf Lord under the control of the Judge. A meal of raw meat must be consumed each time the character transforms or lose 1 point of Stamina each night and transform again each night regardless of the moon until such a meal is consumed. The character’s alignment will also gradually change to Chaotic if it wasn’t already. The disease can be cured by the Remove Disease or similar higher level spell.

These Large werewolves are led by the Demon Servant of the Werewolf Lord. Their sole purpose is to prevent the reawakening of the Wolf Lord. The Demon Wolf servants of the Werewolf Lord are larger than average wolves with thick black fur, red eyes and sabretooth fangs.

Alpha Servant of the Werewolf Lord: (Type III Demon) Init +7; Atk bite +10 melee (1d10+2) Claw +9 melee (1d8+2) ; Crit 18-20; AC 17; HD 6d6+6; MV 40’; Act 1d24+ 1d20; SV Fort +6, Ref +6, Will +5; AL C. Infravision. Return to home plane when destroyed. Immune to weapons of less than +2 enchantment or natural attacks from creatures of 5 HD or less; half-damage from fire, acid, cold, electricity, gas; Vulnerable to Magic Weapons, Silver, Cold wrought Iron and wolfsbane. Being bitten by this creature applies a debilitating form of lycanthropy. (See above.)

This Huge beast has been sent to kill anyone attempting to awaken the Wolf Lord from his slumber at any cost. He appears similar to the Large members of his pack, but more horrible, frightening, and hunched over.

*At the Judge’s discretion, the werewolves may teleport away at 3/4 of their starting hit points, choosing to face punishment at the hands of their master.

After the battle, the Wolf Lord appears.

Read aloud:
As soon as the last of the demons falls, they all vanish into dust. The Wolf Lord appears as a light blue, glowing ghost of his former self.
“Thank you for coming to me after these long years of rest. Unto you I will bestow a few humble gifts. After you return to your world above, please spread the word of my return to the forests and hills of my home world. You are akin to my pack now. I will forever be in your debt.

The group will have the opportunity to speak to the Wolf Lord and ask as many reasonable questions as they like. The Judge is free to fill in the details. The Wolf Lord is benevolent and considers the group to be his new pack.

The Wolf Lord will allow the survivors to speak with fallen members of their group. He would be able to revive a fallen member of the group if they request it. Otherwise, fallen PCs may be resurrected as wolves or allowed to return to The Happy Hunting Grounds if they wish.

Loot: The sword Wolf’s Fang will be awarded to whoever carries the wolf’s tooth. The cloak will be awarded to a suitable roguish type. The Grimoire that explains the Wolf Lord’s Coven and benefits of converting to being one of his followers. Finally, the witch’s journal details 3 new spells specific to the Wolf Lord and those who follow him.

Once the group is done collecting their loot, a portal appears in the tree roots behind the wolf bones. It leads back to the surface above. It closes once everyone steps through.


1d12 Random Potion of Appearance Effects for any Fantasy RPG.

Roll 1d12 and consult the following table. Potion effects wear off after 1d12 hours when applicable. AND

Roll 1d12 at least once per travel session.

Roll 1d12 and consult the following table. Potion effects wear off after 1d12 hours when applicable.

  1. Slow Shrinking: Character loses approximately one inch of height per minute for 1d12 minutes.
  2. Slow Growth. Character gains approximately one inch of height per minute for 1d12 minutes.
  3. Hair Growth: Character grows 1d12 feet of hair uncontrollably, even from places hair doesn’t normally grow! Can be cut/trimmed/shaved as normal.
  4. Hair Loss: All of the character’s hair falls out. Grows back as normal over the regular number of days/years.
  5. Skin Thickening: Character suddenly grows a full inch deep layer of thick, callused, numb skin over the entire body. Returns to normal when the potion wears off.
  6. Bright Glowing: Character begins to glow brightly after 1d12 minutes. Regardless of clothing/armor, the glow is as bright as an open bonfire until it wears off.
  7. Opacity Reduction: (This one is kinda euww.) Character’s skin becomes 90% transparent. Whatever muscles, bones, or blood vessels are under the skin become visible until the potion wears off.
  8. Toenail Growth: Fingernails/Toenails and even horns/claws permanently grow 1d12 inches until trimmed/cut.
  9. Bizarreness: Character’s eyes, ears, nose and mouth sprout 1d12 inch tentacle stalks, wiggling about on the ends. Character must concentrate to look in a specific location until the potion wears off.
  10. Sweaty Mucus: (This is pretty euww.) Character emits a thick, green, slippery, strange-smelling mucus through pores in the skin until the potion wears off. Bonuses/Penalties subject to GM approval.
  11. Bug Eyes: Character’s regular eyes are replaced by large, geospherical insectoid eyes until the potion wears off. If the character was already an insect, the effect is reversed giving human appearance until it wears off.
  12. Awkward Bloating: Character puffs up like a marshmallow. No physical effects, it just looks inflated.
Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com

1d12 Temporal Fantasy Forest Camping Hazards.

Roll 1d12 at least once per travel session.

  1. Swarming Mosquitoes of Unusual Size: They are huge. Camp was accidentally set too close to their breeding ground. They bite. The may possibly be carrying disease. They are large enough to carry off a fully loaded pack mule en masse. Fire and smoke repel them.
  2. Quick Mud: Character rapidly sinks 1d12 feet into a seemingly normal patch of ground. Drowning may result per quicksand rules. (1d12’x 5′) x (1d12′ x 5′) patch of ground.
  3. Contaminated Water Source: A magic user upstream has dumped a bunch of magical potion ingredients and it ended up pooling near camp. Drinking and cooking with this water may likely have some freaky effects. Bathe in it at your own risk.
  4. Whirling Dervishes: Strike the camp randomly at awkward momentsThese miniature tornadoes are attracted to the spot where the group has set up camp. They will blow tents around, possibly spook the group’s animals and extinguish campfires. Overall they are harmless, just very annoying gusts of wind.
  5. Ants! If you thought the mosquitoes were bad, these ants are more efficient and apparently hungry. The group must have accidentally set their campsite up near the ant hill. The ants will make off with as much food and other edible provisions as they can carry.
  6. Magical Magpies: nest nearby. They are harmless, but imitate the voices of any conversation within range making things very confusing.
  7. Dungeon Entraaaance! Somehow the group manages to set up camp near the entrance to an abandoned underground complex of the GM’s making. One character will accidentally fall into a hole leading to the complex. Lucky them?
  8. Raspy Berries: Raspberries plucked from a nearby bush seem perfectly normal. For some magical and unknown reason, these berries cause whoever eats them to be afflicted with a hoarse, raspy voice for 1d12 hours.
  9. Mice: These mice live in a nearby tree stump and will try to sneak into camp for food, warmth and polite conversation. They are harmless regular mice except they are moderately intelligent and can speak. Let the cartoonish antics begin!
  10. Fungus Among Us: Rapidly advancing magical moss from nearby trees blankets anything it touches in a matter of hours. It covers one 5′ square per hour advancing toward the group’s campsite. It is otherwise harmless, just slimy and annoying.
  11. Spiders! These extremely zealous web weavers cover the area while the group sleeps in sticky white webbing. There is a chance the group can see these mostly harmless pests coming by observing their surroundings. However, if the group stumbles too close, a hatching cloud of the baby arachnids might rain down upon them. At least they’re not venomous.
  12. Freaky Firewood: The group has managed to acquire firewood from a sleeping treant. Hopefully they only picked up discarded branches from the ground nearby, but it might wish to speak to them about that fire. (Intended as a non combat encounter.)

d12 Tables Terrain for Hex Crawl

The starting hexes for my DCC hexcrawl campaign. These tables have not been thoroughly tested yet. Constructive feedback welcome.

Working on building random Hexes and Events for my Dungeon Crawl Classics Hexcrawl game.

Roll 1d12 or choose as appropriate.
(If the Judge deems necessary, the terrain may match a connecting hex.)

  1. Chaos! Roll on the Elemental Chaos table.
  2. Arctic. Snow and ice everywhere. Sudden windstorms and freezing temperatures.
  3. Tundra/Taiga. Frozen plains with some forested area possible.
  4. Civilization! Roll for size and disposition on Urban Settlement table.
  5. Temperate Forest. Deciduous Trees and conifers. Fairly dense underbrush.
  6. Plains. Grasslands with an occasional tree or pond.
  7. Grassy Hills. Rolling hills covered in grass. Occasional tree or pond.
  8. Water. Could be the start of an ocean or just a lake or river. Roll 1d12 for adjoining hexes. 1-7 = Water (same type.) 8-12 = Land.
  9. Swamp. Thick vegetation. Lots of water. Lots of living creatures.
  10. Desert. Sand everywhere. Very little by way of water or vegetation.
  11. Mountains. Jagged rocks, valleys, canyons and of course, mountains.
  12. Jungle: Vegetation thick and overgrown everywhere. Very warm.

Elemental Chaos Subtable:

  1. Water
  2. Ice (Water/Air)
  3. Steam (Fire/Water)
  4. Mud (Water/Earth
  5. Earth
  6. Dust (Air/Earth)
  7. Magma (Earth/Fire)
  8. Fire
  9. Smoke (Air/Fire)
  10. Air
  11. Aether (Ghost/Spirit World) Keeper may wish to roll terrain above.
  12. Astral! Air is still breathable, but all other terrain effects are completely chaotic.

Civilization and Ruin Subtable

Roll 1d12 or choose if Keeper deems appropriate.

  1. Necropolis: There once was a thriving settlement here. Now abandoned and in ruin. Could easily be populated by any number of creatures, demons, or un-dead.
  2. Empty.
  3. Small settlement, no larger than 100 beings.
  4. Road. May be only traces of an old road or trail
  5. Village. 100-200 beings.
  6. Dungeon! An underground complex filled with treasures and monsters.
  7. Eerily Empty.
  8. Abandoned settlement or village. Why is it empty now?
  9. Hidden settlement. 1-120 beings living in the terrain out of sight.
  10. Town. 200-300 beings with most amenities, trade, and services.
  11. Hidden lair: A dragon, demon, powerful un-dead, elemental, giant, or other huge nasty dwells here out of sight.
  12. City or large civilized area. May include a castle, keep, or fortress.
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