Monstober Day 29: Wing.

The Turkey Demon: A jet black fire-breathing turkey with six tentacles and it can fly, too.

The Turkey Demon: A jet black fire-breathing turkey with six tentacles and it can fly, too.

Turkey Demon (Type 3): Init +2; Atk tentacle +9 melee (1d4) and beak +10 melee (1d8); AC 16; HD 6d8; MV walk 20’ or fly 40’; Act 7d20; SP Infravision, darkness (+12 check) grasp 1d4, Breathe Fire SV Fort +5, Ref +2, Will +5; AL C.

Immune to weapons of less than +2 enchantment or natural attacks from creatures of 5 HD or less; half-damage from fire, acid, cold, electricity, gas.

Tentacle attack: For each tentacle that strikes the same character, the demon receives 1d4 on an opposed Strength check to hold the character down. For example, if 6 tentacles hit a character in a single round, the character takes 6 points of damage, and the demon rolls 6d4 on a Strength check against the character. If the demon wins the Strength check, the character is grappled and cannot attack unless he spends the next round struggling and succeeds on an opposed Strength check. The demon may not use its breath weapon while a character is grappled.

Breath Weapon: The Turkey Demon breathes a cone of shadowy fire, width 1d4x10’, length 1d6 x 10’ 6d8 damage, Ref save for half. Characters hit with the breath weapon continue to burn with corrupt flame for 1d6 damage per turn for 1d3 turns.

Monstober Day 21: Tooth.

CW: Gore
The Tooth Golem is one of the most horrific creatures ever conceived. No one is quite certain what sort of demonic or arcane magicks were used to create such a horror, or whether there could even be more than one in existence. Very few who have seen it have lived to tell the tale, and then only in delirium stolen from nightmares.

Tooth Fairy? Try Tooth Golem.

Compatible with Dungeon Crawl Classics and other D20 games.

The Tooth Golem is one of the most horrific creatures ever conceived. No one is quite certain what sort of demonic or arcane magicks were used to create such a horror, or whether there could even be more than one in existence. Very few who have seen it have lived to tell the tale, and then only in delirium stolen from nightmares.

This garish monstrosity stands close to seven feet tall with an oversized maw of razor sharp fangs atop a humanoid body comprised almost entirely of teeth. It is so gruesome that most intelligent humanoids must make a DC 10 Willpower Save or turn away in fear for 1d6 turns. This only applies once per creature ever even if the save was failed.

Tooth Golem: Init +3 ; Atk Tooth-covered fist +3 melee (1d8 + Bleeding Wounds,) Terrible Bite +6 melee (1d10 + Bleeding Wounds + Terrible Wounds); AC 16; HD 4d8; MV 30’; Act 1d20 + 1d16; SP bleeding wounds, damage vs unarmed attackers Half damage from normal weapons; SV Fort +4, Ref -2, Will -2; AL N.

Bleeding wounds. The wounds inflicted by the golem continue to bleed until bound or healed. Each wound causes the loss of an additional 1 hit point per round until dealt with.

Terrible Bite. The Tooth Golem’s bite leaves sharp fragments in the wounds it inflicts, doubling the hit point cost of healing them.

Because it is covered in rows upon rows of razor sharp teeth of differing kinds, any creature making an unarmed attack on it automatically suffers 1d6 damage.

Due to its freakish bony exterior, the Tooth Golem only takes half damage from normal slashing and piercing weapons. Full damage from blunt and magical weapons.

There are rumors that a sabretooth variant may have been created.

(Art to be determined. Do you really want to see a picture of this thing?)

Promptober Day 22: Giant/Colossus.

This nearly 20′ tall statue made entirely of brass has the head and tail of a dragon, but the arms and legs of a humanoid. (No wings.) It was built by a wizard an indeterminable number of years in the past. From time to time it continues to lumber on, as if searching for something or someone.

The Draygolem, colossal half dragon, all golem.

DrayGolem (Brass): Init +6 (surprise); Atk Giant Fist +11 melee
(2d8 +5) Tail Strike +7 Melee (2d10), Breathe Fire 2x/day Ranged Damage 4d8 40′ Cone Fire Ref Save DC 17 for half damage, AC 16; HD 9d8; MV 25’; Act 2d20; SP Immune to normal weapons, Fire damage heals, Doesn’t need to eat, breathe and sleep, Infravision 30′ (*Immortal); SV Fort +11, Ref +3, Will +7; AL N.

This nearly 20′ tall statue made entirely of brass has the head and tail of a dragon, but the arms and legs of a humanoid. (No wings.) It was built by a wizard an indeterminable number of years in the past. From time to time it continues to lumber on, as if searching for something or someone.

It never hesitates to smash or hoot fire all over anyone foolish enough to step into its path. It is relentless, but may be slowed by cold water or even freezing temperatures. Cold attacks and large bodies of water cut its movement to 10’/round and 1 Action. It is also a bit clumsy and could be tripped or forced to stumble.

Judge’s notes: This is intended to be a challenge for the players not to kill, but to slow, incapacitate, change its course or otherwise stop it from endangering innocent lives. If stopped, it will regenerate 1 hp per day until it reaches full health again. It could potentially be destroyed? if dropped into a deep ocean or a volcano.

It may also be possible to stop or even command the creature if someone could learn the creature’s command words. A lot of difficult research and probably a large dungeon crawl (*To be detailed later) would be involved to learn more about the creature and how to stop it. Ultimately it is up to the Judge as to how the creature was forged and how to ultimately stop it.

Also, somewhere in the world, there are rumors that the creature’s wings were forged, but never mounted. If the Draygolem ever found the wings, what would happen? Does the creature know its wings are out there?

(Artwork to be determined at a later date.)

Does the Number of Books Matter?

I strongly considered Basic D&D, literally just Basic as opposed to OSR or all of the variations on OSR. I considered Pathfinder 2E, but the rulebook is pretty hefty and there are so many character options. And last, there was good old 5E. So many options, but what would work best for me?

I submit to you 4 systems, one dungeon.

I’ve wrestled around with what system I want to write in as my primary game system for fantasy dungeon crawls. I mean, technically I could pull out more than four. Open Legends, Mythras, ICRPG, Bare Bones, FATE, and more all got pulled up as possibilities. But I was determined to go with what I know best.

My latest dungeon effort, one room at a time on my blog here, The Catacomb of the Wolf Lord, is done with Dungeon Crawl Classics. I strongly considered Basic D&D, literally just Basic as opposed to OSR or all of the variations on OSR. I considered Pathfinder 2E, but the rulebook is pretty hefty and there are so many character options. And last, there was good old 5E. So many options, but what would work best for me?

So much source material to choose from.

My meager Pathfinder Second Edition collection. But is it good for dungeon crawls?

One thing I love about D&D 5E is that it is probably the single most expanded upon RPG in the history of games. I thought I had a lot of 3E monster books from various publishers. Some folks in the community call it “bloat.” Regardless of what it’s called, there are hundreds of variations on classes, monsters, spells, etc. Given the amount of options, I decided to go for something a little simpler.

Let’s be clear, though. The amount of options isn’t as negative as the Old Grognards Society might have you believe. The massive amount of options is less daunting as long as the DM and the group agree on what can be used or not used. At some point, there just comes a point when the group agrees this far and no farther. The same applies to homebrew.

Too much material sort of my issue with PF2E, but not the only one. Paizo has printed some seriously impressive books, especially monsters, for Pathfinder 1E. PF2E has three bestiaries to date. Their conversion of 1E source material has been fantastic so far.

Recently Paizo announced a new title that would be 5E compatible. PF2E sales are not as stellar as maybe they could be according to some. If I were going to try to make some cash on DriveThruRPG from this dungeon, maybe PF2E isn’t the way to go? I’ve also never been a fan of the Pathfinder’s campaign world. It’s okay, just not my jam, maybe.

DCC has a whopping two books of official content, not counting modules, zines, and Lankhmar. Basic D&D has surprisingly few monster books as well. T$R was pretty good about not flooding the market back then. Of course, back then it was presumed DMs were creating their own homebrew monsters. Third party companies weren’t going bonkers with anything but modules as far as I remember. DCC is pretty much built for modules.

It’s not so much quality over quantity.

DCC Annual Vol 1.
So far the only major DCC sourcebook of note.

There are other factors at play. Sure DCC is extremely homebrew friendly and pretty easy to publish modules for it. Sure it’s familiar from the 3E D&D days. (Yes, I’m enamored with it as of late.) It’s got a lot going for it!

What D&D and Pathfinder both need (IN MY OPINION) is a narrowing. At its very core of any game is a basic set of stats, abilities, weapons, spells. The wheel can only be reinvented so many times over, right?

DCC offers that exact notion that rules can be narrowed. I’m not spending endless hours as the GM trying to dig through classes, subclasses, feats, skills, and so on. DCC is pretty basic Fighter, Thief, Cleric, and Wizard. The races are classes unto themselves. Nothing complicated.

I can go nuts (re)creating monsters, spells, items and even demigods all I want. Goodman seems cool about everything. But DCC isn’t bloated, either. The field is wide open like back in the Basic D&D days. Which is not to say the Internet isn’t absolutely thick with expansion material. But the DCC Core and Annual are all I’m using, plus whatever I can borrow, steal or create on my own.

D&D Basic is inspirational for DCC because of its classes, spells and weapons. Races were still considered classes in DCC and the monsters translate from Basic to DCC freakiness pretty well.

The best part is I can look at all the other books for PF2E and D&D 5E for inspiration. Outright plagiarism is not cool. NEVER EVER directly copy something and claim it as your own. It’s not fair to other creators.

The only two Basic D&D books I will ever use. These are reprints because my original Rules Cyclopedia fell apart after years of service. You can still get these titles from DMsGuild.

Borrowing concepts and abilities from other games is legit. Out-and-out plagiarism is not.

However- you can re-skin, change abilities, reorganize and rename creatures any time the situation dictates as long as you’re doing most of the above at the same time. An Orc by any other name is a Klurg, hailing from the far desert, with orange skin and wielding a khopesh made of solid obsidian. (Steal at will, I don’t mind.) Orcs in my campaigns typically behave like Star Trek Klingons, anyway. You can be original without doing all of the legwork over and over. (Remember that whole thing about reinventing the wheel?)

I see DCC has a Werewolf Lord, so why not a Wolf Lord? They compete with one another. One represents nature in three different aspects. The other represents the horrible abomination of man and nature. This will be fun! Clerics and Wizards will both benefit.

Thanks for stopping by!

The homebrew potential in DCC is immense. Plus it can always convert to other games quite easily. ICRPG is an easy conversion. D&D 5E and PF2E are also possible with a little time. I think the in-depth systems are awesome for more serious role-playing where DCC is great for beer-n-pretzels dungeon crawls.

Game on, family! See you soon. Hope you’re having a fabulous week.

DCC Catacomb of the Wolf Lord Room 1-1

Over a century ago, the physical bones of the Wolf Lord were lay to rest. A sword of legend and other riches lay within the tomb.

This is the first room of my new dungeon.

Room 1-1 and the hallway leading to the dungeon. What mysteries lay within?

A couple of farm kids accidentally excavated an entrance to an ancient burial mound deep within the ground. It is perfect for adventurers who want to make a name for themselves exploring the tunnel and beyond.

The tunnel is long and unlit. The walls are mostly made of packed earth and stone with the occasional very old wooden brace. Those familiar with the earth may make a check to notice the grade of the floor. The long tunnel goes down about 3′ for every 5′ square. There are torches sunk into the walls every 30′ of the 120 foot tunnel.

The walls are old, but have held up exceptionally well over the years. The whole place smells earthy and musty. It is obvious no one has passed through here in many years.

Room 1-1: At the end of the long tunnel are 6 alcoves, 3 on each side of the wall with what at first may appear to be dirty old bronze or iron statues. Closer inspection reveals they are actually zombies that activate and attack!

6 Zombies: Init -4; Atk bite +3 melee (1d4); AC 9; HD 3d6; MV
20’; Act 1d20; SP un-dead; SV Fort +4, Ref -4, Will +2; AL C.

After the battle, the party will see two huge iron banded thick wooden doors. Both are locked. In front of the door are the corpses of what appear to be two dead adventurers. The bodies are very old, perhaps a century or more. There is little more than scraps of cloth and bones. Closer inspection will indicate the doors were closed by the adventurers before they succumbed to their wounds.

Loot: Rummaging through the deceased adventurers will yield a Silver Dagger, a pristine set of Thieves Tools, a scroll with the Level 1 Spell- Ropework, a solid staff, a Level 2 Enchanter’s (Neutral Wizard) spellbook with 7 First Level Spells, and a journal with entries regarding the Wolf Lord. (See Bevin’s Journal.)

The two large stone doors are locked. The lock is centered between the two doors. A large bronze carving of a wolf’s head is above each door. The lock is DC 15 with a Poison Needle trap within that triggers when the lock is opened with anything other than the proper key. Trap DC 15 to detect/disarm. The poison is the equivalent of Asp Poison Fort Save DC 20 1d3 Agi/1d6 Agi. Normal healing.

Once the doors are opened… To be continued.

%d bloggers like this: