Monster of the Week 1d12 Tables

A couple of modern horror RPG tables just for fun.

Or any generic modern horror campaign.

Roll 1d12 on the table below:

Viral Internet videos and photos:

  1. Drone footage of a clown in a nearby field.
  2. UFO over the city within the last week.
  3. Large, hairy biped seen in the woods a few miles of town.
  4. Extraterrestrial caught on camera in a local driveway just passing through.
  5. Vague Cryptid seen walking through a convenience store parking lot in the early morning hours. Could be a dog? Or maybe a monkey?
  6. Gray alien caught on doorbell camera late at night.
  7. Local hunter sees ghost on trap camera.
  8. Kids conducting a seance at 3:00AM in a local cemetery get really freaked out and run away from unseen force.
  9. Local ghost hunters have multiple positive contacts in a downtown building recently scheduled for demolition.
  10. Child goes missing in the middle of the night only to be found the next day in a field 20 miles away bewildered and unharmed.
  11. Local police officer catches photos of a black dog with eerie red eyes crossing the street late at night.
  12. Local kids shoot video of objects moving around the house with them.

Bonus Table: Freaky Locations for strange happenings.

Roll 1d12. Randonautica, eat your heart out.

  1. A shed in a suburban backyard far older than the surrounding houses.
  2. A pair of grave markers in a well known town park.
  3. An abandoned car from the 1930’s in a field on the edge of town.
  4. The old veterans hospital near the center of town.
  5. A Freemason temple now a hospice.
  6. An old Native American burial ground underneath a residential district.
  7. A house in an old residential neighborhood abandoned for over a decade.
  8. A pauper’s graveyard covered by a high school football field.
  9. The WW1 exhibit at the local museum.
  10. Junkyard/Landfill built on top of a Civil War battlefield.
  11. Under an old bridge.
  12. An old well on the farm nearest town.

Power Rangers RPG Threat: Fishface.

Things are getting fishy with this villain for Power Rangers RPG.

Inspired by the Murlocs of WoW fame.

“Who would have thought when we woke up this morning we’d be fighting a walking, talking 300 pound mackerel with a herring for a sword?” –Rose, Pink Lightning Force Ranger.

I drew this. Please be kind.

Fishface (normal)
THREAT LEVEL: 4
SIZE: LARGE | HEALTH: 9
TOUGHNESS: 15 | EVASION: 14
WILLPOWER: 14 | CLEVERNESS: 12
GROUND MOVEMENT: 40 ft. | SWIM: 60 ft.
Fishface has been sent to Earth by General Gnarl of the Triumvirate to probe the oceans in search of the Ninja Steel encased Zeo crystal and/or the Rangers’ Base of Operations.
SKILLS:
Alertness +d4
Targeting +d4
Might (Melee weapons) +d6*
Perception +d4
Languages: Putty, English, Fishenese.
PERKS:
Amphibious: Fishface can breathe air and water.
Underwater Acuity: Gains an Edge on Perception and Alertness when underwater.
Immunity: Poison
ATTACKS:
Herring Blade (Sword): +d6, Reach (Toughness, 1 Sharp Damage)
Pufferfish Grenades (Bomb) +d4 Range: 20′-50′ (Evasion, Sharp 1, 10′ Radius.)
Glop Gun: +d4 Targeting. Range 20′-50′ (Evasion, Stun 1, Paralyzing.)
POWERS:
Summon 2d8 Fish Putties: Fishface can call upon amphibious Putty Patrollers that appear similar to him, complete with their own Fish “Swords.”

Coming Gigantified to an ocean fighting venue near you. Have fun.

Catacomb of the Wolf Lord: Room 1-3

Room 1-3 of Catacomb of the Wolf Lord. The group may have found treasure, but is it cursed?

The “Treasure” Room.

The entrance to the Treasure Room 1-3 is concealed under a thick layer of old mud and gravel. In the dim lighting and all of the mud, the door will be difficult to find. If the group “plays” with the elementals, more earth will be caked onto the old mud. Ask the players if/how they are searching.

If the group finds the door and excavates it, it opens into Room 1-2. Beyond the door, there is a 5’x5′ unlit hallway leading to another door. Across the way, is a wrought iron bound locked door. The lock is trapped and will drop a 1 ton granite block on the trap victim and blocking the hallway. (Detect Trap DC15.)
Pick Lock DC 18. 8d6 damage from the block + being pinned. Reflex Save for no damage.

If successful, the door opens into a magically lit 15′ x 15′ room, domed ceiling with a faint glowing light in it, with a magical circle drawn on the floor. Inside the circle are four items. The first is a dagger (athame) in an ornate wooden box. The second is a leather bound book with a lock and key. It looks to be very old. The third is a gray fur cloak with an ornate wolf’s head clasp. The fourth and final item is a wolf’s fang.

Once the first character fully enters the room, a ghostly wolf appears. It speaks clearly to the group. It points to each item with its nose and states, Cleric, the dagger; Wizard, the book; Thief, the cloak, and Fighter, the tooth. Read the following aloud:

The ghost stares at you, or possibly through you. It points to each item and states clearly a second time Cleric, the dagger; Wizard, the book; Thief, the cloak, and Fighter, the tooth. Choose wisely. You make only keep one. Bring it to my final resting place for your real reward if you are so worthy.The rest are cursed.

It sits and says, “I’m waiting for your answer. You may ask one question of each item if you wish. One I shed. One was my end. One was my life. One is my gift to you if you are worthy.”

The ghost, a spirit messenger of the Wolf Lord, will answer truthfully one question of each item within reason. Its answers will always be cryptic and vague. It won’t try to encourage or discourage the group from choosing any of the items. It might also answer a little more about itself.

The Wolf Lord wasn’t always a wolf. It lived for a while as a man to better understand men. He took an elven bride and had two children: Koga and Kei. Koga became feral and ran away at a young age to join a wolf pack. Kei grew up to be a refined elven lady. (Current whereabouts unknown.) The Wolf Lord eventually rejoined his spirit pack and left his mortal family behind.

After many centuries, the great animal lords were forgotten. In turn, each returned to a sacred place where a coven of followers put their bodies to rest and sealed them away from the mortal world.

*Note: If any of the cursed items have the curse removed, the item is rendered permanently inert.

A) The athame is a cursed dagger +1. It radiates strong magic. The wielder must feed it one hp per day or lose 1 Stamina each day the hp requirement is not met. The wielder may not give its own hp.

B) The Coven’s Spellbook: The Coven’s Spellbook is a cursed antithesis of all that is Lawful or Neutral. Any mage who opens it will automatically become Chaotic, and will turn more toward being un-dead with each page read. Any/all spells copied or cast from the book with automatically backfire. Any creatures summoned automatically turn on the caster. It was never meant for the world of the living.

C) The Cloak of the Gray Wolf: At first, this cloak appears to not be cursed. It offers a +1 Agility bonus to Stealth and +1 bonus to AC. Once per day it allows the wearer to shapeshift into a normal wolf. All items become part of the new form. Mental stats stay the same.

Wolf, common: Init +3; Atk bite +2 melee (1d4); AC 12; HD
as wearer; MV 40’; Act 1d20; SV Fort +3, Ref +2, Will +1;

The ability resets at sunrise.
But the cloak is cursed. At the first full moon after acquisition, the wearer transforms permanently into a wolf under the control of the GM until the curse can be lifted.

D) The tooth is a regular tooth. It is not cursed, nor is it terribly useful yet. However, it is the key to unlocking the real treasure in Room 2-2, the Wolf Lord’s burial chamber.

While the Wolf Lord is considered a demigod and will grant certain spells to his followers, this is clearly not the book to do it with. The Wolf Lord will be available as a Mage Patron and as a Demigod to be detailed elsewhere.

Once an item is chosen, the rest vanish along with the circle and the lights in the room. The eerie outline of the spirit can still be seen, but it will not interact after the choice is made.

That’s it for this room. It’s obvious the other party never made it to this room. The journal makes no reference to tests or treasure beyond a vague mention of some kind of treasure believed to be buried with the bones of the Wolf Lord himself.

Thanks for being here! I appreciate you. Can’t wait to see what happens in Room 1-4 and 1-5? Hang in there. They’re coming soon.

It Has Arrived!

So, briefly- ICRPG is simple, adaptable to any setting, brilliantly designed, and has revolutionized games outside of itself.

My copy of Index Card RPG Masters Edition finally arrived today!

Snoopy vulture.
c/o United Features Syndicate.

Probably not the most monumental thing to ever happen in the world. But it’s exciting for me! A short while back, Hankerin Ferinale announced that ICRPG Masters Edition was going to be available as Print On Demand from DriveThruRPG. This was awesome! Monumental!

No offense to the nice folks at Modiphius, but I really didn’t have the scratch to buy the $50 hardcover plus shipping. I’ve noticed our FLGS don’t readily carry it. (I checked stores in two states, sadly.) $50 is a lot of money for me these days.

So I ordered it online and the wait began. I perched on our mailbox day and night waiting for it to arrive. This happened with Mecha Hack as well because I love the Brandish Gilhelm (aka Hankerin) artwork. The artwork is only matched by the brilliant game design. ICRPG never disappoints.

I loved the last edition of ICRPG so much. I was overjoyed Runehammer (aka Hankerin, aka Brandish) had made this book available for almost a third of the hardcover price. Of course, I poured over the pdf like crazy, but I love a physical copy of any game, especially this one.

Full confession: I’m biased toward ICRPG and have been since I discovered the game years ago.

So, briefly- ICRPG is simple, adaptable to any setting, brilliantly designed, and has revolutionized games outside of itself. Masters comes with ICRPG Worlds built into it. This game gave us Old Grognards a new way to look at adventure, room, and combat design. Hankerin is clearly a veteran of many RPG campaigns in several genres and it shows in the way ICRPG is written.

The Index Card portion of the name is legit on several levels. It’s a good way to organize as a GM. The game literally encourages this. It’s a brilliant way to keep track of rooms, traps, monsters, spacecraft… You get the idea. Professor Dungeon Master of YouTube fame has latched onto this game and for good reason.

I’m so happy! It finally arrived!!! Worth the wait.

My own campaign settings will be getting dusted off soon.

The nice thing about Masters is that the actual mechanics haven’t changed too much. I’m looking to pull out my ICRPG samurai campaign and maybe putting it out soon. I’ve contemplated a few other games using these rules as well. My meager artistic skills are not as impressive as Brandish’s, though.

ICRPG is a dream to run and create more content for GMs. I really can’t say too many good things about it. Players can pick up these rules in less time than D&D 5E or faster if they’re familiar with any D20 game.

I rely on Bitmoji and stock art for a reason. LOL!

Thanks for stopping by. I appreciate you! Please try ICRPG if the opportunity presents. It really is worth a try.

Also, thank you Runehammer for putting out such an awesome game. I can’t tell you how much fun I have designing game worlds for this system. Your hard work makes a lot of joy possible. You rock!

Monster of the Week: Continuing the Conversation

I’m loving Monster of the Week more every day. This game is well-designed and has so much to offer new Keepers.

Monster of the Week by Evil Hat Productions.

MotW is a fascinating RPG.

I really dig this game, but it’s taking a little bit of getting used to. Specifically, the Keeper’s section. I’m probably going to have to run a couple of mysteries before I get the hang of the system.

I still feel like it’s a little stiff and rigid from the Keeper’s side of the table. Then again, I’ve always felt that PbtA in general is a push toward GM-less roleplaying. As I say often, if that’s what you’re into, go for it.MotW would be a tough run without a Keeper because someone has to come up with all the cool monster and plot stuff, right?

I keep coming back to Page 131.

I actually think MotW is great for new GMs (Keepers.) They give you a play-by-play how to way to run a game session. They give all kinds of really solid advice on running a #ttrpg. The core book gives two mysteries and walks the reader through how to run them.

How awesome is that if you’re brand new? I would have loved this back in ye olden days. I’m still wrestling with it mentally now. It’s like learning to run a game all over again.

Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? It’s the same thing I’m already used to doing, but I never referred to it as “using moves.” Up until this came up, I never had a strict list of principles to stick with in order to run the game.

My long standing way of setting up a campaign (*Oops! Not supposed to say, “campaign” any more. Now they’re “plot points.”) So, my long standing way of setting up plot points is episodic in format. I plan 24 sessions/games. At one episode per week that’s about half the year give or take. It rarely works that way, but that’s how I plan it.

My original planning for this game was to set up 24 episodes with pretty specific agenda. So, I hit rewind. It’s going to be more of a sandbox now, kinda like I planned Power Rangers RPG campaign. (Which is also still in the works, btw.)

I’m going to build a set of case files that the group can fall back on for clues and in-character advice. They’re following a group of three hunters that have vanished or moved off grid for mysterious reasons. Not really X-Files, but more like Giles’ school library in early Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The group’s mystery files won’t cover every mystery, though.

I already know who the first season BBEG looks like and what they’ve got going on. We’re going to touch on some real world conspiracies and paranormal events. I already know who most of my Bystanders, Minions, and Monsters are going to be. I have most of the behind-the-scenes stuff worked out. I think we’re still going to do episodes, but they’re going to be more like story arcs and done similarly to the way they’re described in the MotW core rules.

They have a very nice template worked out for writing mysteries. They walk the reader through all of the steps of mystery creation. It’s brilliant! Other game companies could learn from Michael Sands.

In short, with any game system, harvest what you like, pass on the rest. There is no one set way to run a game, as many, many of us have said. I’m personally just struggling to learn and adapt to the PbtA way of doing things.

I’m going to be dropping some of my mysteries on here, since I’m not expecting my players will read my blog. Bwah Ha Ha. I’ll put trigger warnings on the really gruesome stuff. I have an in-game calendar of events in my head, depending on which hooks get a bite. <“evil” Grognard Keeper noises.>

Thanks for being here all. I appreciate you! Have a great weekend!

DCC Tomb of the Wolf Lord Room 1-2

The group has survived the first room and breached the doors. What now?

*Read aloud: The lock clacks open and the doors swing open into the room. The right side door swings open freely, but the left door is obstructed and only opens part way. The left door is stiff, as if something heavy was on the floor behind it.

The room has a very earthy smell and no visible light sources, save the group’s torches. At a glance there is mud everywhere. Some has been dry for ages, some is fresh.

A low scraping sound of slow movement can be heard. It sounds as if someone is dragging a stone through thick mud. Soon, you see a pair of orange eyes peering back at you in the darkness.

Room 1-2.

Room 1-2: The right door opens freely, save the initial push to break free of the mud. The left door is obstructed by the body of Therin, the brave fighter. The blade of his sword became stuck under the door. The bulk of his heavy plate, now full of mud, is also behind the door.

The room might have been carefully excavated originally, but is now coated in thick mud on the floors, wall and ceiling, forming a pocket of air. Most of the features of the room are concealed, making searching the room difficult. The torch sconces are long since buried.

The pressing issue in the room is the sudden appearance of an Earth Elemental from the neck up in the center of the room. It appears curious and watches the group intently. If the PCs try to attack or approach aggressively, the other two elementals will join their brothers in attacking the group.

However, if they are cautious, the PCs can approach the Earth Elementals and discover them to be quite playful. Unfortunately for Therin, he discovered the elementals like to play extremely rough. The pocket of air formed by this room is a strange playground for the elementals. They were likely attracted by the earth magic used to create the final resting place of the Wolf Lord, or by the coven as a natural source of defense.

Elemental, Earth: Init +4; Atk slam +12 melee (4d6); AC
20; HD 8d8 MV 30’ or dig 30’; Act 1d20 (or
more); SP elemental traits; SV Fort +10, Ref +4, Will +8; AL
N

If the group is careful, they can search the room for the concealed doors leading to the treasure trove (1-3,) the preparation room (1-4,) and the ramp down to the chamber of tests (1-5.) More information on those rooms to come.

More information on the Journal to come.

Thank you for being here! I appreciate you! Game on!

Inspiration for Dungeon Crawl Classics Material.

I am a big fan of the Beg, Borrow, and Become-Inspired-By school of campaign and dungeon design, however. What’s a game without homebrew materials? Especially one like DCC that strongly resembles old school D&D.

I borrow from other RPGs when building campaigns for just about anything.

I have three games that I am drawing a lot of inspiration for my DCC campaign. I’m building this game for fun, partly on here, partly just for fun. Three games immediately came to mind when I first read through DCC. They were Warhammer FRP (First Ed mostly,) Hackmaster, and Earthdawn.

I’d be remiss if I left off prior editions of D&D, but I think that should be pretty obvious. I really liked a lot of 3rd Ed. The Diablo 2 books were of particular interest for DCC given that game is almost a never ending dungeon romp. There are also some keen things in 4th Ed, oddly enough. I’m thinking of borrowing some items and abilities from that edition.

*Disclaimer: I’m not publishing anything that I borrow directly from any of these games. I am a big fan of the Beg, Borrow, and Become-Inspired-By school of campaign and dungeon design, however. What’s a game without homebrew materials? Especially one like DCC that strongly resembles old school D&D.

The 0-Level funnel and class abilities in DCC immediately made me think of Warhammer FRP.

Ran this a lot back in the day.

The first edition of WFRP was epic in its own right. The classes and utterly brutal combats made for an outstanding game. The combat and class abilities are a nice fit with DCC. I may actually consider pulling some of the classes over. They’re pretty simple. Heck, DCC is a pretty simple system to begin with.

DCC only has 10 class levels to work with. The previous 0-Level career also plays in a lot like good old WFRP’s mulitclassing options. Not to mention WFRP’s rich world and grim fantasy adventures. This system begs to be pillaged for spells, items, and character classes.

The Dungeon Crawls and overall camp value reminded me of Hackmaster.

Using a game that emulates another game for ideas in a game that emulates the same game… Deep thoughts.

I still have all of the Hackmaster books within easy reach on my shelves. I’m most likely going to pull some of the less cartoonish weapons and monsters from Hackmaster. Every time I look at DCC, I think of Knights of the Dinner Table. The Hackmaster sword, the Crossbow of Slaying, and a Fireball coming online.

Yes, Hackmaster is a campy take off of Rolemaster and old D&D, but it is hilarious and a lot like DCC in its delivery. Given a +2 weapon is noteworthy in DCC, I’m sure the big ticket items from Hackmaster will fit in quite nicely. The modules for Hackmaster are knockoffs of old D&D modules, so converting them should be fun. I also like Flateroy’s Guide to Fortification and plan on pillaging some from that book.

Last but not least is Earthdawn.

FASA really out-did themselves with this RPG in terms of campaign creation and world design.

I played a lot in the first two editions of Earthdawn. The Horrors are ridiculously powerful. Magic was its own sort of special. The gods? Long gone, IIRC. I miss a lot of the Earthdawn world

When I read through the magic system and saw the variable monster tables (*Demons, Dragons, etc) toward the back of the book, Earthdawn immediately came to mind. I think a few d12 tables of unspeakable random horrors would be good for DCC. I’m also considering adding Windlings to DCC and possibly Orks and as friendly races. I think adding Trolls and Obsidimen might be a bit too much.

Thanks for stopping by. More to come. Have a great week!

My Recent Foray into Monster of the Week.

I will say this game truly inspired me to go back to my old Hunters Hunted and Call of Cthulhu: Delta Green notes. I’ve always wanted to run a sort of detective agency mystery/horror game.

Monster of the Week from Evil Hat Games.

Monster of the Week by Michael Sands

I kept seeing this game go by in various places and I finally got curious. While I have sort of a love-hate relationship with horror games, this got my attention because it’s more focused on the good guys. I prefer my horror games to be A.) Not completely hopeless for the PCs, and B.) Told from the perspective of regular people fighting the darkness. Monster of the Week gets it done for the most part.

A friend on RPG Twitter mentioned this as their favorite game and I became curious. My first venture into the Powered by the Apocalypse (PbtA) system was with Henshin:Sentai the RPG and I have to say left a bad taste in my mouth. I still kinda feel like PbtA is a bit restrictive in terms of the PC actions and character creation. It feels to me like we’re constantly using Pre-gen characters. A lot of experienced gamers prefer to customize heavily.

I will say this game truly inspired me to go back to my old Hunters Hunted and Call of Cthulhu: Delta Green notes. I’ve always wanted to run a sort of detective agency mystery/horror game. My wife is a huge Buffy the Vampire Slayer fan. I’m big on Evil Dead/Army of Darkness. I also have my own personal freaky experiences to draw from if so desired.

Honestly, I love horror movies. I see so many things that are just laughably stupid. No one in their right mind would do some of the things characters in horror movies do and I find it amazing that some of the simplest solutions to these paranormal terrors are often overlooked.

I have so many scenarios in mind for this game already, I’m having trouble writing them all down fast enough. I’m inspired. Don’t know if I’ll have a group or if this will be an online game just yet, but I’m excited nonetheless.

One thing I really admire about the game is that they seem to have a playbook for just about everyone. Great job! It does take some of the analysis paralysis out of character creation.

Powered by the Apocalypse.

Evil Hat delivers once again!

Tome of Mysteries for MotW. Fantastic Sourcebook!

I’m a big fan of FATE as well. Part of the appeal of Monster of the Week was the quality that comes with all of the games I’ve seen from Evil Hat. (*Minus Thirsty Sword Lesbians because I haven’t read through it yet.) These folks also write a heck of a sourcebook, IMO.

I’m talking about Tome of Mysteries for Monster of the Week. They added more moves, playbooks, and a bunch of GM Advice. I felt some of the moves they added in this book were overdue and excellent additions. The GM support for MotW in general has been awesome. It has made setting up a sandbox easier for this game and dispelled some of my long-held beliefs about writing for horror games. I give it a huge thumbs up.

I can’t wait to get a chance to try this game out. I have a LOT of projects in the works right now. I hope to get some of my series outline posted eventually, as soon as my calendar clears up.

Thank you for stopping by. Happy May Day. I appreciate you!

1d12 Dungeon Rumor Table

First Table: 1d12 Rumors about Dungeons.
Bonus Table: Not for the Squeamish.

Roll 1d12 to give hapless adventurers what the local subterranean scene might be. (DM/GM will determine the truth of said rumors.)

  1. Some farm kids plowing a nearby field unearthed a large boulder covering the entrance to nine levels of pure hell containing wealth beyond imagination.
  2. A very old Dragon sleeps in a mountain not too far away. It’s been asleep so long, some think its lair is unguarded and it might even be dead.
  3. A lone tower sits in the middle of an open plain with very little around for miles. A powerful lich built it to protect its research.
  4. The oldest cottage in town conceals a ritual summoning circle. The witch who lived there used it to open a portal to her underground stronghold.
  5. A general from a long forgotten army lies buried under the fields south of town. It is said his soldiers were incredibly loyal and remained with him even in death.
  6. Creatures made of dust, smoke and ash can still be seen circling about the old druidic circle on a new moon.
  7. The crazy old hermit in the nearby mountains is actually a disgraced wizard and his cave is secretly the entrance to a much older complex.
  8. There is a partial map to a renowned buried treasure in an unmarked grave in the old cemetery outside of town. The problem is finding it without digging up massive amounts of ground. The group knows where the other half of the map is located.
  9. A much older village lies in ruins underneath a city the group frequents. It has recently become a source of ghosts and other unhappy spirits.
  10. A nearby hill is actually a buried pyramid that contains a portal to other dimensions.
  11. There is a secret entrance to a dragon’s lair underneath the nearby lake.
  12. Townsfolk digging a new well have discovered a “strange glowing boat” buried beneath the otherwise landlocked site.

Bonus Table: 1d12 Horrible Mysterious Deaths.

(*Trigger Warning: This is intended for generic fantasy/horror and could possibly trigger trauma in some readers. It includes mentions of homicide, gore, and sensitive subjects. Reader discretion is advised.*)

  1. Body was found bereft of head and completely exsanguinated with no blood on the scene.
  2. Victim appears to have drowned in less than a teaspoonful of water.
  3. Empty husk of a body was found at the scene. It crumbled to dust as soon as someone touched it.
  4. The ghost of the recently deceased can be seen standing above the body waiting for someone specific.
  5. Several bodies have been found in separate locations recently covered completely in green moss from head to toe. No one seems to know how they got there.
  6. The body was found with no flesh covering the skull and a rare gem in each eye socket.
  7. The body is found writhing on the ground. It is full of scarab beetles.
  8. The deceased spontaneously frozen to death in a crowded room.
  9. The victim isn’t actually dead, but in a state of deep suspended animation.
  10. The body is booby trapped with poison cactus needles that protrude as soon as someone touches it.
  11. The body dissolves into a pool of acid slime as soon as someone says the name of the deceased.
  12. A demon tears its way out of the body in the while everyone is eating breakfast.

Of course, none of this is meant to be a suggestion. Let’s keep the fantasy/horror on the gaming table. This was a work of fiction.

Ending on a much freakier note than usual. Thank you for being here. I appreciate you! Have a great weekend.

Power Rangers RPG General Mayhem and the K Putties.

Stats for the General and K Putties as promised.

No, that’s not the name of my garage band.

The General was modeled after American General Douglas MacArthur.

General Mayhem (normal)

THREAT LEVEL: 5

SIZE: LARGE | HEALTH: 5

TOUGHNESS: 16 | EVASION: 14

WILLPOWER: 10 | CLEVERNESS: 10

GROUND MOVEMENT: 30 ft.

SKILLS:

Might +d8
Intimidation +d6
Perception +d2
Targeting +d6

Languages: Putty

PERKS:

Summon 2d6 additional Krohn Putties per encounter

ATTACKS:

Fists (Might): +d8, (Toughness, 1 Damage)
Pistol: (Targeting) +d6 (40ft/75ft Energy 1 or Stun 1)

POWERS:

Shapeshifting: The general can make himself appear human at will, requiring 1 Action to shift between forms. He may be able to shift into appearances other than General Brooks.

HANGUPS:

Arrogant.

Krohn’s Putties aka K-Putties.


THREAT LEVEL: 3
SIZE: COMMON | HEALTH: 3
TOUGHNESS: 16 (18)| EVASION: 13
WILLPOWER: 12 | CLEVERNESS: 11
GROUND MOVEMENT: 25 ft.

They are stronger as well as better armed and armored than average Putties, but a bit slower.
Armor: +2 Toughness, Deflective.

SKILLS:
Might (Martial Arts) +d6*
Athletics +d4
Targeting +d4*
Alertness +d4
Languages: Putty, understands English
PERKS:
Coordinated fire. If 3 or more K Putties fire on the same target, +1CS on their Targeting Roll. A hit still does damage for 1 weapon.
ATTACKS:
Buzzsaw Sword (Martial Arts): +d6*
(Toughness, 1 Sharp Damage)
K Putties are brutal in melee combat.

Bolter Pistol (Targeting) +d4 Range 30ft/50ft. Ballistic, Damage: Blunt 1/Stun 1

HANGUPS:
K-Putties are slower and chunkier than normal putties. As a result they may only ever shoot or attack once in melee. They do still explode like regular putties when defeated.

You may have guessed by now what these guys are based off-of.

Here’s to hoping GW doesn’t freak out on me. Thanks for being here. Have a great weekend!

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